“Fortunately, it is not reason which puts an ally together. It is the body. You have perceived ally in many degrees and on many occasions. Each of those perceptions was stored in your body. The sum of those pieces is the ally … Our reason is petty and it is always at odds with our body. This, of course, is only a way of talking, bu the triumph of a man of knowledge is that he has joined the two together.”
Carlos Castaneda

Tales of Power

At Home

n

For almost three years this post was presented at the beginning of my blog. It was set there as a wish and a reminder for a change in my life. A few days ago I decided it was finally time to let it go. I am at home now. This post is here to tell you that a lot of my energy is now … at home. Though I still write here, I write much more at Bhudeva – an online reflection of our physical home. You can find me here as well as there :)

“One of the most joyous things we can do is to find our place, the land where we belong. Having found our place, we snuggle into it, learn about it, adapt to it, and accept it fully. We love and honor it. We rejoice in it. We cherish it. We become native to the land of our living.”

Carol Deppe

Posted in Expanding, inside | You are welcome to add your comment

female to male

n

I enjoyed the short “demonstration” in the beginning of this inteview with Jane Goodall in which she shows how she would approach a dominant male:

Despite the comedic tone I felt that she brought to the surface something profound which continued to resonate throughout the short and unimportant interview. Colbert portrays a cynical individual that dominates interviews that usually succumb to humor and irony … and it was beautiful to watch her disarm him using the same feminine wisdom she introduced in the “demonstration”.

Posted in Enjoy, inside | You are welcome to add your comment

TheNewIRS & SecondGov

n

A joy to watch this video of Alex Ebert introducing SecondGov and TheNewIRS. His work resonates so closely with a story of Oameni that I’ve been carrying with me for some time. As I listened to Alex’s soft and inviting story telling I could feel my body relaxing into an embrace of a comforting knowledge that someone is actually creating this. Joy :)

 

 

Posted in Enjoy, Expanding, inside | You are welcome to add your comment

Charles Eisenstein: Great Souls

n

“We often think of misfortune as some kind of punishment for past evil, a theme that runs through religious thought both East and West … How else to explain the sweet, innocent babies in the children’s cancer wards? If we are not to resort to blind, pitiless, purposeless chance, we need another explanation for the innocence of our victims. Perhaps they are great souls, meeting the huge necessity for innocent victims that our civilization has wrought. “I will go,” they say. “I am big enough. I am ready for this experience.””

Charles EisensteinThe More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible

Posted in Expanding, inside | You are welcome to add your comment

Charles Eisenstein: Evil

n

“Evil is not only a response to the perception of separation, it is also its product. How do we deal with this implacable, malevolent Evil? Because force is the only language it understands, we are compelled to join it in force … Human beings have been committing horrors for thousands of years in the name of conquering evil. The identity of evil keeps changing—the Turks! the Infidels! the bankers! the French! the Jews! the bourgeoisie! the terrorists!—but that mindset remains the same. As does the solution: force. As does the result: more evil.”

Charles EisensteinThe More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible

Posted in Expanding, inside | You are welcome to add your comment

Charles Eisenstein: Psychopathy

n

Most of the quotes I have recently posted from Charles Eisenstein have shimmered for me to share with others, this one is more of a bookmark for myself.

“Here is another story from Book IV of the Liezi (translation Thomas Cleary):

Lung Shu said to the physician Wen Chi, “Your art is subtle. I have an ailment; can you cure it?”

The physician said, “I will do as you say, but first tell me about your symptoms.”

Lung Shu said, “I am not honored when the whole village praises me, nor am I ashamed when the whole country criticizes me. I look upon life as like death, and see wealth as like poverty. I view people as like pigs, and see myself as like others. At home I am as though at an inn, and I look upon my native village as like a foreign country. With these afflictions, rewards cannot encourage me, punishments cannot threaten me. I cannot be changed by flourishing or decline, gain or loss; I cannot be moved by sorrow or happiness. Thus I cannot serve the government, associate with friends, run my household, or control my servants. What sickness is this? Is there any way to cure it?”

The physician had Lung Shu stand with his back to the light while he looked into his chest. After a while he said, “Aha! I see your heart; it is empty! You are nearly a sage. Six of the apertures in your heart are open, one of them is closed. This may be why you think the wisdom of a sage is an ailment. It cannot be stopped by my shallow art.””

Charles EisensteinThe More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible

… and I, after many years of wondering about my inability to experience happiness (even when I am “up”) directly (only through others), have recently begun moving not towards an answer but rather towards a wider question … realizing that I don’t seem to experience sadness (even when I way “down”) either …

Posted in Expanding, inside | You are welcome to add your comment