“The future remains uncertain and so it should, for it is the canvas upon which we paint our desires. Thus always the human condition faces a beautifully empty canvas.”
Frank Herbert

Children of Dune

Christopher Alexander – Kitchen Sequence

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There was a section in book 2 dedicated to the idea of sequences … about hot important the order is in which structure preserving transformations steps are taken. There wasn’t a sweet and succinct quote that shimmered for me and in a way it (ironically) is a missing step in the overall order of quotes that I’ve collected. I’ve also wanted to link to this non-existing post about sequence numerous times from other quotes and could not because it isn’t there to link to.

I may go back and see if something there shimmers for me, however for now I do want to make a note of this fascinating example of two kitchen design sequences. They are mentioned within a text about how CAD design could be improved to support creation of living structures. The first is a typical mechanistic process, the other on that places more emphasis and value on centers and a sequence that creates a living space:

“Typically, for example, consider the following kitchen layout process that is available commercially:

  1. Take the kitchen floorplan.
  2. Decide where you want the outer wall.
  3. Decide how long to make the counter.
  4. Decide where to put the refrigerator.
  5. Decide what color to put on the walls.
  6. Decide what tiles to put on the floor.

… Why do I say that this is not a living process? I say this because the process does not encourage the use of structure preserving transformations. It does not encourage the creation of living centers. It does not even draw the user’s attention to the idea of living centers, nor to the possibility of making centers, stronger and more living in the kitchen, so that the user can direct himself to this aim.

… a kitchen design sequence, which does focus on centers and their emergence, and on the adaptive process which allows a person to use these centers for themselves. This sequence has the following steps:

  1. Think about the activities in your kitchen and formulate them as generic centers.
  2. Decide the size and shape of the kitchen.
  3. Place windows in the kitchen, to bring beautiful light into the room.
  4. Place a big kitchen table as the main focus of the kitchen.
  5. Place a fireplace to form a secondary center in the room.
  6. Place an outdoor kitchen garden, according to sun and wind and view.
  7. Place a door leading to the outdoors.
  8. Place the kitchen counter and your workspace in a good relationship to the main centers.
  9. Put in thick walls around the room, to supplement the table, fire and counter.

Christopher Alexander – The Nature of Order – Book 2: The Process of Creating Life

I don’t know if reading this out of context of the entire work is useful to others, but for me this is a vital example and reminder.

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