“This very rock where we’re sitting is a rock because we have been forced to give our attention to it.”
Carlos Castaneda

Tales of Power

On Choice and Constraint

n

An excerpt from Off Our Butts

“Now, in 2016, cigarette smoking in North America is indeed more common among people living in poverty. They smoke because they do not have the time or money to eat properly, because other, more respectable mind-altering drugs are not available to them, because it is something to enjoy. They do it because their jobs (when they still exist) are so boring and physically painful that they would rather die. Yet professionals in the wellness industry routinely describe their smoking social inferiors as “stupid” and “irrational” on the basis of their supposedly self-undermining lifestyle choices.

It’s by now an iron law that whenever the poor are discussed, so are their “bad life choices.” If professionals can’t do something properly or fast enough, they can readily avail themselves of a diagnosis of one or another “health problem”—even something as vague and generic as “stress” or “burnout.” These are conditions that are imagined to have stricken them randomly—as opposed to a malignant, self-inflicted malady tied to their lifestyle, upbringing, or that sketchy antidepressant they stupidly decided to take. Even though so many children of the professional class clearly have asthma due in part to the persistent bourgeois hygiene neurosis (the antibacterial hand gel all but mandated by this neurosis being a proven contributing factor), they and their germophobe parents deserve empathy, time off, and specific disability rights. By contrast, working-class smokers deserve only reproach and are asked to tiptoe around the expansive, socio-moral and self-induced sensitivities of the rich.

Once, at an Occupy Wall Street assembly, standing six feet beyond the last concentric circle in the parking lot, I lit up a cigarette. In short order, I was asked to leave. I insisted on Occupying.

Like them, we shall pursue our own desires for pleasure no matter how whimsical, and if our desire is to smoke, then offended professionals can just hold their breath for once—perhaps using this blessed interval of silence to meditate on their thieving class and its own grotesquely swollen “carbon footprint.” If state and capital are going to steal our precious energies and vast hours of our lives to line their pockets with profit, leaving us with poor sleep, insufficient rent money, and a diet of 7-Eleven specials as we provide the country’s most basic services, the very least we deserve is to enjoy our cigarettes in peace. So if anyone asks, it’s not that smoking should be permitted because cigarettes can be proved an absolute good, which they cannot, but simply because for the time being we happen to smoke them. We might call this giving professionals a taste of their own entitlement. Heaven forbid they choke on it.”

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Wintergatan

n

You may enjoy following my journey of discovery, or you may want to skip to the last video … but don’t miss the last video.

I started here:

then the wheel:

and arrived here:

and with a feeling of sweetness I thought I was done and … well… then this:

“Thank you for that! But I do think, though, that it is mostly about being able to put in the time! I mean the talent of being stubborn and able to see things through are more important than the abilities you have to start with. If you work hard on anything, you will learn what you need and success!”

… and there’s more … seek and ye shall find 🙂

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Douglas Rushkoff at SXSW 2016

n

I have been following Douglas Rushkoff since his launch of the TeamHuman podcast. I recommend it very much. This talk is a good introduction to his work.

The main thing I like about him is that he builds a good bridge between two worlds that in my existence seem separate. The people in my life can be clearly divided into two camps:

  1. One is the “mainstream people” which includes people who live a mainstream life and people who are aware that there are other avenues, but do not pursue it … so still living embedded in mainstream society. When I can and there is an interest I try to give these people a glimpse of the other alternative world I am exploring.
  2. The other group are the “alternative people” who are partners in the exploration-into-an-unknown  I find myself living in. Some of these people are also comfortably embedded in this alternative world that they are sometimes less informed about the happenings of the mainstream world.

Douglas Rushkoff, I feel, does an excellent job of bridging these worlds. He is able to describe both the mainstream world and the alternatives in a coherent, sensible and continuous narrative that makes it accessible to both of “my worlds”. With that in mind I offer this excellent talk to both of “my worlds”:

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Vata in Software

n

Though I have moved away from the more hard-core environment of software development I still enjoyed this talk very much. It talks about something which can look inconsequential – software versions and its effect on software creation. The subject, though technical, is framed in this talk as a matter of relationship amongst developers.

There are very few people with whom I can chat about the two worlds of Yoga and Software (because very few people that I know have / had a foot in both worlds). What shimmered for me in this talk is the quality of vata (shity and volatile energy) which I feel is so much a part of software development. It is mostly my wish to stay healthy while respecting my own energy patterns that keeps me away from writing code. This talk sheds some light on the vata nature of software.

The presenter is Rich Hickley who is the founder of a programming paradigm language called Clojure:

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Charles Eisenstein In Conversation with Rupert Sheldrake

n

An inspiring listen … feed your soul with some heart-flavored meta-science:

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Thank you Ramona, Attila, Raluca and Derek for Nyeleni

n

It doesn’t seem like I’ll be writing in depth about my experience at the Nyeleni Europe conference. I have much to say, but I am not motivated to say it … and this post from another participant does a good job of touching on some (not all) of the subjects that resonated inside me.

However, one thing has persisted in me … and I do want to express my gratitude to Ramona, Attila, Raluca and Derek and the interns of EcoRuralis who together with the volunteers that surrounded them made it possible for me to partake in and witness such an event. This was possible for me because 1) the event was held here in Cluj (I would not have travelled for it) and 2) they invited me to be part of the Romanian delegation.

I do not consider myself an activist and I am always grateful for the inclusiveness and embrace I feel from the EcoRuralis team, both personally and in the context of Cutia Taranului. This feeling was with me from first meeting them almost 6 years ago (by randomly walking into their office) and was amplified against the backdrop of the Nyeleni conference. The voice of Nyeleni, as it manifested in this conference, was one of extreme, loud and painfully aggressive activism. It made me appreciate the qualities of moderation, reason and humility of the EcoRuralis team. Encountering them personally during the event created small islands of sanity.

Given that I live in semi-retreat, for me the event was a precious opportunity to witness what activism in Europe looks like (at least around food sovereignity). It was inspiring to see so many people come together around a shared interest, especially given the efforts that I imagine went into everyone converging on Cluj together. It was inspiring to know that this subject is in the consciousness of so many people across Europe (and beyond). It was impressive to realize the large populace that was represented in this forum … given that almost every person present at the conference represented anywhere from tens to thousands (and more!?) of people in their repective countries and communities. It was impressive to sense how a basic need like food can cut through cultural differences and become a shared and uniting thread.

It was also impressive (though in a different tone) to see the ease with which failed constructs in our current governing structures are subtly replicated in activist circles that want to introduce change. I feel we have much to learn and practice in coming and being together before we can take on complicated subjects such as food sovereignity. I do not feel “we” have earned the right to use that word “we” as obviously as some may want to. To make this point more concrete I want to give this small, recent and concrete example.

In the weeks following the event we were contacted by the Crisan family who have since joined Cutia Taranului with a special (sold out) Christmas box and a few variants of meat boxes that will start to be delivered in January. Their farm has been shrinking and collapsing (and they’ve had to take on office jobs for income) because they haven’t been able to market their produce … hopefully that will change now. Both we as Cutia Taranului (who are looking for local producers to bring to market) and the Crisan family (a producer that was looking to find a market) are members of EcoRuralis and yet we did not find each other and connect.

If we did not connect and come together when we were so near and so relevant to each other within a clear and shared context, how can we expect to collaborate on larger (national, European, or international) scales? I do not say this with a sense of blame. I offer it as a sobering observation (firstly to myself), a reality check to what I felt was an illusory sense of community that was conjured up at Nyeleni. I recognize and appreciate that we want to be community, but a group of people shouting demands together with fists in the air does not create community (its sad and scary).

YET … the fact that I was able to travel to the city for 5 consecutive days and be around more then 500 other people was a good sign. It told me that beneath the superficial manifestations lay something potent and valuable. I am grateful for the opportunity to have been there and to have witnessed it. Now, on with connecting producers and eaters … and hopefully a warm winter next to the rocket stove 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

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Government as a Platform

n

This may seem slightly off-topic, but for me there is some valuable cross-over of ideas and domains that do relate to Oameni.

This is a presentation by Tom Loosemore about his work in the UK Government Digital Strategy during the 2015 Code for America summit. In it he describes an architectural view of a government that harnesses digital technology.

My main reflection during and after it was:

  1. Can something like this be built from the groundup – grassroots style. Given that governments are not likely to get there very soon, is this not something that civil society can create for itself and then provide to the government as a tool of governance?
  2. Can something like this be built with a view that goes beyond the national … I’m thinking as a planetary platform?
  3. Can something like this be built as open-source packages that can be instantiated many times in many countries / contexts? After all if something like this is good for one country or city, then it must be good for other countries / cities. Can we, as a species, be smart and efficient about how we go about creating this? Can “creating a government infrastructure” strive to be as simple as creating a WordPress site?

Some thoughts I wanted to capture from this presentation:

“New public infrastructure requires new public institutions.”

The guidelines within which this vision was developed:

“The public has expectations:

  1. Services so good they were previously unimaginable.
  2. Services which work first time in real time.
  3. New services set up in weeks, and run at fraction of today’s cost.
  4. Ministers can see if their policy is working as intended within days or weeks, not decades.
  5. Those on the front line can focus their effort on supporting those who need help the most.
  6. Fraud to be “designed out”; Security to be “baked in”; Defences against both evolve to meet emerging threats.
  7. Services to be highly responsive to feedback from their users.
  8. Accountability should be crystal clear & people able to give instant democractic feedback.
  9. Services should only use “just enough” personal data; The citizen should be in control of how and when their data is accessed.
  10. Open public data is canonical, infrastructural, and immutable; Services use open standards and create open standards.
  11. Services should gracefully span local, central and devolved governments … provided the user consents.
  12. Policies and rules that are visible as code, and you can validate them as a citizen.
  13. Everything is available through an API for 3rd party use … provided the user grants permission, and it’s secure.”

And this architectural view which is explained in the presentations:

governmentasplatform

Also worth checking out these Design Principles

Keep tabs on Richard Pope and James Stewart

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Back to Her Man

n

Damien Rice homage to Leonard Cohen

 

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The American Dream!?

n

This powerful piece about the Unnecessariat describing an out-of-view America and explaining how Trump happened. I was surprised, given that I come from a different background and reality to find that I resonated with this part:

“To know that nothing more is expected of you, or your children, or of your children’s children, than to fade away quietly”

I have written before about how, during my last years living in Israel, the conversation about lack of money in my life transformed into a lack of relevancy. I became more concerned with not being relevant or needed in my society, then about not being able to extract money from it. I came to Romania to create space between myself and that question … to gain perspective. I found some relevancy here … it is both precious and fragile.

“… The number of overdoses in 2014? 47,055 of which at least 29,467 are attributable to opiates … families are being “hollowed out” with elders raising grandchildren, the intervening generation lost before their time … neighborhoods are collapsing into the demands of dying, or of caring for the dying.

Suicide is up as well. The two go together: some people commit suicide by overdose, and conversely addiction is a miserable experience that leads many addicts to end it rather than continue to be the people they recognize they’ve become to family and friends … Both suicide and addiction speak to a larger question of despair. Despair, loneliness, and a search, either temporarily or permanently, for a way out.

… Its no secret that I live right smack in the middle of all this, in the rusted-out part of the American midwest. My county is on both maps: rural, broke, disconsolated. Before it was heroin it was oxycontin, and before it was oxycontin it was meth. Death, and overdose death in particular, are how things go here.

And yet this isn’t seen as a crisis, except by statisticians and public health workers.

… In 2011, economist Guy Standing coined the term “precariat” to refer to workers whose jobs were insecure, underpaid, and mobile … The term found favor in the Occupy movement, and was colloquially expanded to include … unpaid interns, adjunct faculty, etc. Looking back from 2016, one pertinent characteristic seems obvious: no matter how tenuous, the precariat had jobs. The new dying Americans, the ones killing themselves on purpose or with drugs, don’t. Don’t, won’t, and know it.

… Here’s the thing: from where I live, the world has drifted away. We aren’t precarious, we’re unnecessary.

… Utopians on the coasts occasionally feel obliged to dream up some scheme whereby the unnecessariat become useful again, but its crap and nobody ever holds them to it … what if Sanders (or your political savior of choice) had won? Would that fix the Ohio river valley? Would it bring back Youngstown Sheet and Tube, or something comparable that could pay off a mortgage? Would it end the drug game in Appalachia, New England, and the Great Plains? Would it call back the economic viability of small farms in Illinois, of ranching in Oklahoma and Kansas? Would it make a hardware store viable again in Iowa, or a bookstore in Nevada? Who even bothers to pretend anymore?

Well, I suppose you might. You’re probably reading this thinking: “I wouldn’t live like that.” Maybe you’re thinking “I wouldn’t overdose” or “I wouldn’t try heroin,” … This isn’t the first time someone’s felt this way about the dying. In fact, many of the unnecessariat agree with you and blame themselves- that’s why they’re shooting drugs and not dynamiting the Google Barge … You’ll get there too.

If I still don’t have your attention, consider this: county by county, where life expectancy is dropping survivors are voting for Trump.

What does it mean, to see the world’s narrative retreat into the distance? To know that nothing more is expected of you, or your children, or of your children’s children, than to fade away quietly and let some other heroes take their place? One thing it means is: if someone says something about it publicly, you’re sure as hell going to perk up and listen.”

via Sam Muirhead

 

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Practice Reflection – Fall 2016

n

This reflection is long overdue … but my writing motivation is still low and my ability to do so fragile … I hope I can recall some of the subtleties that appeared along the way.

Relationship with Practice

My allergy period this year ended somewhere around mid-July. It lasted slightly less then two months. It was overall easier, but I don’t feel it was due to internal circumstances. I do feel that is mostly due to numerous early frosts that destroyed much of the spring flowers which resulted in less pollen in the air.

I tried, during the allergy period, to stay in touch with practice but it was a futile attempt. With breathing at the heart of practice and my breathing severely compromised practice is difficult to access. Attempting to stay with it formed an additional layer of aggravation due to the instability of practice itself. Letting practice go was a practical decision, not a deeply conscious one.

However at one point I realized that I lost not just the practice but also the wanting to practice. That brought with it a subtle anxiety. One of the things I experienced in the period of practice prior to the allergy period was that the practice was somehow embracing, holding me. I had a very stable period of practice that came with little effort. Now that was gone, and I was afraid that it wouldn’t come back. My fear was “confirmed” when my allergy got slightly better and I tried to get on the mat (maybe too soon) and again met heaviness, friction and instability. Once I WAS able to practice, I, to my surprise and relief, fell quickly back into the embrace of practice.

Breath First

When I resumed practice I resumed the same practice I was doing before the allergy period … and physically it was fine. But when it came to my pranayama, I was exhausted and could not tap into my breathing capacity.

So I started an experiment, that to some extent, is still ongoing. I starting tuning my practice into a more cikitsa version. It took a few days of transformations .. and with every transformation (reduction and softening) in the asana sequence I found a growing space for re-inhabiting my breath. Over a few days the breath developed: just ujjayi breathing allowing the breath to expand, re-introducing holds, resuming pratiloma with less holds and less repeats and within a few days I was back to my full pratiloma practice.

Over the first month of steady practice I got reestablished in the breath and gradually re-introduced modifications that brought me closer to my full asana practice. At that point I started to feel a sense of vitality again. I experienced a feeling of lightness in my practice. I distinctly recall the feeling of coming up from various forward bends with a sense of a strong center and a lighter body … as if I was lifting up less weight … a lighter version of me.

Energy and Core

At least a couple of times during this period where I had a distinct experiences of energy in my core (abdominal area) as a foundation for … well … almost everything I am and do with my body.

A prominent experience was while working on the earthbag cellar. I wasn’t sure I wanted to go out (I was in a healing cycle), but the weather was nice and I wanted to give it a try. I attempted to lift something (with some substantial weight, bot not too heavy, and not something I hadn’t lifted many times before) … and it required much more effort than usual.

As I observed this and a some following movements I realized that I felt weak in my center. I wasn’t able to activate my abdominal muscles. I didn’t have a feeling of grounded center from which I could move, extend or leverage. I rely mostly on my center for strength and stability, I am not a very athletic or physically large or strong. With the center gone, I had to rely on my peripheral muscles … and that gets tiring fast. And even though I can get away with it for a while, the quality of movement is lesser … less precise, less reliable, less stable, less enjoyable. Within a couple of minutes I realized, acknowledged and communicated that I was not up for working.

The initial experience of lack of core energy became a fascinating reference point for experiencing its recovery. I could witness, almost every day, a slight improvement. It is in everything … in standing and walking … in a sense of stability … vitality. I witnessed life and strength return to my abdominal area. The change was so drastic that it was clearly not a biological change. I don’t think it was (is)possible for me lose or gain muscle mass or flexibility in such a short period of time. It felt much more like an energetic shift.

It was refreshing and empowering to go back out after a few days and feel … centered and vital again. Losing it was an invaluable experience to appreciating it.

Life Again (… and again)

I have taken up this post after another few weeks of delay since I wrote the initial part … and that is the essence of “life again”. This has not been a period of “life throws things at me” but rather me inviting things into my life. The overall experience has been a sense of depletion. But not deep depletion. Rather cycles of depletion during which I take something in and incorporating it, digesting it, consumes enough of my energy to leave me in a disturbed state. A state I felt a need to recover from … sometimes with clear physical signs of illness, sometimes with only subtle physical signs, sometimes with an emotional fuzziness … in all cases reduced clarity.

I am now exiting a period of sickness . Together with the intensive 5 day event (Nyeleni) which I attended, that may become another three week period without on-the-mat practice. Though my energy may support a soft practice, my breathing (blocked, broken and limited) does not leave me space for an engaging practice. Attempting to practice in this way creates more friction then flow.

I am also heading (hopefully!) into a period with few distractions. I feel a turning inwards as winter sets in. Starting to settle into a raily routine with more time indoors, regular lighting and feeding of the stoves. I am looking forward to reconnecting with a regular and inward moving practice.

 

 

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Sinkholes: The Groundbreaking Truth

n

Something is happening to the ground beneath our feet:

… and I wonder … how does a major shift effect in electrcomagnetic fields effect our physical body, our consciousness? … and is there an effect in the opposite direction … can our state of being effect the sun’s activity?

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some words on philosophy

n

this excerpt felt more promising when I started reading the article, but I found no satisfaction … except for the trigger point … I feel that, though we may collectively feel we know what’s going on, that it is now how I feel … I feel that we are in an era in which everything is up for grabs … money, law, country, science, society, relationship … there is a more comprehensible list somewhere inside me but I don’t feel like formulating it.

I was also amused by how “scientists struggle to understand how consciousness arises from matter” … that question is valid in a world where matter does not have consciousness … if you change that assumption the question goes away 🙂

Eras in which everything is up for grabs are very rare, and they seem to be highly productive for philosophy. As Gottlieb points out, much of the Western philosophy that still matters to us is the product of just two such eras: Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. and Western Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries A.D.

It is hard for us to comprehend how totally Western consciousness was transformed during the second of these two periods, precisely because we live in its aftermath. In just a few generations preceding it, every fixed point that had oriented the world for thousands of years began to wobble. The discovery of America destroyed established geography, the Reformation destroyed the established Church, and astronomy destroyed the established cosmos. Everything that educated people believed about reality turned out to be an error or, worse, a lie. It’s impossible to imagine what, if anything, could produce a comparable effect on us today. Even the discovery of alien life in the universe wouldn’t do it, since we have long learned to expect such a discovery, whereas medieval Europeans could never have anticipated the existence of America, or of electricity.

Philosophers are people who, for some reason—Plato called it the sense of wonder—feel compelled to make the obvious strange. When they try to communicate that basic, pervasive strangeness or wonder to other people, they usually find that the other people don’t like it. Sometimes, as with Socrates, they like it so little that they put the philosopher to death. More often, however, they just ignore him.

Even today, cognitive scientists struggle to understand how consciousness arises from matter, though few doubt that it does.

… One of the most popular names for the unexplainable is God: God is how we answer questions about creation and purpose that we can’t answer in any other way. Certainly, both Descartes and Leibniz relied on God to balance the equation of the universe. Without him, they believed, the world did not make sense. The philosophers’ God was not necessarily identical to the God of Christianity, but he had some reassuringly familiar attributes, such as beneficence and providential oversight of the world.

… Spinoza made God so crucial to the world that the distinction between the two collapsed. There could not be two substances in the universe, Spinoza argued, one physical and the other divine, since this involved a logical contradiction. If God and Nature were distinct, then it must be the case that Nature had some qualities that God lacked, and the idea of a supreme being lacking anything was incoherent. It follows that God and Nature are just two names for the same thing, the Being that comprises everything that ever existed or ever will exist.

source

 

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Soylent customers keep getting sick

n

sigh …

“Liquid meal maker Soylent is stopping sales of its flagship powder, warning that a handful of customers reported stomach sickness after consuming it … customer complaints of diarrhea, vomiting and upset stomachs.

Backed by more than $20 million in venture capital, Soylent has emerged as one of several popular start-ups hoping to change what and how people eat. Meant to be mixed with water or other liquids, the powder has enough fats, carbohydrates and other nutrients to replace a traditional meal, according to the company. People looking for a quick fix, such as software programmers in Silicon Valley, have become devotees.

Soylent urged customers discomforted by version 1.6 of its powder to toss it.”

source

 

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What does it mean to be a peasant in Romania?

n

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Economy for the Common Good

n

Economy for the Common Good … being applued in companies, universities, municipalities … using familiar tools of measuring and accounting but applying them to different indicators and goals that are directly (instead of indirect indicators such as GDP) related to well being:

“GDP is not valued in itself but because it is associated with positive values such as jobs or the fulfilment of basic needs. Upon closer inspection, however, in no single instance is the relationship between rising GDP and the achievement of social goals and values assured. That’s why we propose that social goals should be defined and their achievement measured directly – instead of using the uncertain and unwieldy detour of GDP. The mere fact that a science so very bent on efficiency does not measure the achievement of goals directly but instead proceeds via the detour of monetary indicators, i.e. extreme inefficiency, shows that it is more of a faith community than a serious discipline.”

source

 

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Ikigai: A Reason for Being (Purpose)

n

The concept of Ikigai:

ikigai

I don’t feel that I’ve been able to live in this convergence. I would also want to see another dimension in it … one that relates to happiness and well-being since I believe it is possible to live in this convergence with negative outcomes and personal sacrifice in well-being and happiness.

I came across Ikigai in this OK, but tedious and not as convincing as I wanted it to be, presentation from Michel Bauwens:

What disappointed me in the Bauwens presentation was that is felt academic and theoretical (which I’ve come to expect from Bauwens) and offered nothing actionable.

The first question that was given to him by the host (Yohai Benkler – which feels like a name I should recognize but don’t) was good but in my opinion faulty. It assumed (and was not challenged) that because past transitions involved war and bloodshed, that the coming / current value transition would also require wars … and asked where those wars would be. The question forced Bauwens into a kind of theoretical prophecy that led to a very high-worded academic but, in my heart, empty response.

The question of violence also touched on the issue of feminine and masculine dominance (which I felt was wrongly framed as men & women) which came up in the presentation and in a followup question.What if these two issues are related. Could it be that if we had more feminine guidance that we could approach transition with softness instead of harshness? Could it be that that transition is already in the making?

During numerous points in the presentation I felt that Alexander’s unfolding wholeness is a key dimension that was missing from it. Unfolding wholeness, in a way, pulls the rug out from the assumption that there is going to be a definitive transition (or that there ever was one). Instead it postulates that we will witness a continuous and gradual development and change (which is hinted at in the presentation). What if we experience “wars” when we resist this kind of natural development and instead try to push systems (natural and human) into forced, mechanistic and usually destructive change that is better aligned with a dominant (and dominating), male and controlling attitude?

Maybe in a more balanced masculine/feminine world Ikigai is a valid diagram. In the male dominates world we live in, it needs a definitive feminine dimension to be complete.

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Inge Druckrey: Teaching to See

n

Visual inspiration

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Yoga: Tuning & Change On and Off the Mat

n

A recent conversation with Annelieke left me reflecting on the relationship between Yoga on-the-mat and  Yoga off-the-mat. How do life choices off-the-mat resonate with on-the-mat practice to form a continuous tapestry of change?

I was surprised to recall a device I learned about many years ago in high-school when I was studying electronics (surprised because electronics has not been a part of my life except for school). The device is called a phase-locked-loop and was used in FM radios.

fmradio

For those who remember doing this 🙂 … when you wanted to tune into a radio station, say 88FM, you would move a dial and as the indicator neared 88FM the signal would improve. If you shot past it, the signal would fade. There was a sweet spot where the sound came out clearest. What most people don’t know is that there is a finer process of tuning taking place behind the scenes. The dial and indicator are no-where near precise enough to select the actual frequency in which the radio station is broadcasting. The dial only allow you to come close enough for the phase-locked-loop device to kick in and do some automated tuning that locks onto the specific frequency (which is most likely not exactly 88MHZ but a frequency very close to it).

My experience has been that relatively little change takes place on-the-mat. There are fleeting moments of noticeable change, but they are the exceptions to the rule. Most of the time, practice on-the-mat is a repetition. Change is mostly subtle. Change I experience on the mat is like the phase-lock-loop mechanism – subtle tuning improvements to my current channel. It allows me to hear more clearly what the melody of my life is like on this channel.

What about changing channels? Practice on-the-mat does not do that. Changing channels is life changes …  diet, life-style, living conditions, relationships … the practices of yama and niyama. The practice on-the-mat does offer, every time I care to look, a mirror .. an opportunity to see where I am, what my life is like, how I feel. Practice on the mat can help me to refine my listening, to witness better, with more subtlety, with more discernment. But sometimes my conclusion is that I want to change something in my life … I want a different melody … a better melody … I want to change channel.

This also seems to fit with my reflection on the relationship of refinement of ashtanga (the eight-limbs) of Yoga. Pranayama sheds light on the qualities of Asana practices. Asana practices shed light on how I perceive and relate to myself (Niyama). How I relate to myself sheds light on how I perceive the world around me (yama).

A superficial glimpse of Yoga may leave an impression (or carry an expectation) that Yoga is what happens on-the-mat. That logic then begs a question: how does practice on-the-mat effect life off-the-mat? What if that question is inverted? When I get on the mat my entire life comes on with me … every time. There is nothing I can do to prevent it. That logic then begs a different question: how does life meet my practice on the mat?  I do not come to the mat to change. I come to the mat to see where I am and what I see. Discoveries on the mat inform me in making changes in my life.

My ability to see myself with more clarity DOES change on the mat is. That change comes from a long term, continuous, stable, deepening, caring and inspired practice. But ultimately, to experience substantial change, I must take my discoveries on the mat to my life off the mat … and there, I have found, is a life’s worth of demanding practice and potentially unrelenting change.

Getting on the mat opens a door. Change is what awaits me when I walk through that door … and if I don’t … well …

Posted in Models & Metaphors, Yoga, Yoga & I, Yoga & Life | You are welcome to add your comment

Media Literacy

n

Another very good episode of Team Human. This time about media literacy … how to bring into our collective awareness that when we use digital platforms (both as consumers and creators of content) we are acting in a space that has been created and shaped by others. Others have made choices (conscious and less conscious) that effect what we can or cannot do and how we do it and how we perceive what it is we are doing … and these choices not only shape our consciousness but are amplified by it as we engage these platforms in communicating with others … and how true this is not only in our digital world but also in our physical and built world.

What happens when people are awoken to the existence of an underlying program and to the realization that they can be active participants (instead of submissive players) in its creation?

 

Posted in AltEco, Business, Community, outside, Tech Stuff | Tagged | You are welcome to add your comment

To love is to give a space to grow

n

This movie had an interesting quality to it. I didn’t find it particularly moving, nor complete … yet underlying currents in it touched me. Maybe that speaks to Zazen 🙂

“To love is to give a space to grow”

source

Posted in Enjoy, inside | Tagged | You are welcome to add your comment