“Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion"”
Robert Pirsig

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

David Graeber and David Wengrow: Ritual Seasonality and the Origins of Inequality

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Another gem from David Graeber (and friend) …

the core idea is that politics was a seasonal thing … during spring/summer (periods of abundance) society would fragment into small(er) groups of hunter-gatherers who went out on their expiditions and that formed one kind of social-political stage … and during winter they came together into larger social constructs – cities or states. These cyclic experiences gave our evolutionary ancestors an opportunity to experience a range of social structures from egalitarian (based on ideas of equality) to hierarchical ones … an opportunity to see different qualities, different benefits and downsides … and as a result an ability to navigate between the two … maybe some societies avoided hierarchical structures not out of ignorance but because they experienced the inherent problems with them …

David Graeber and David Wengrow: Palaeolithic Politics and Why It Still Matters 13 October 2015 from Radical Anthropology on Vimeo.

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Christopher Alexander on Gene Snippets

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“… the structure of social processes we created during the 20th century, again and again create a mental catch-22 situation where the means needed to escape from the anti-living process, are prohibited by the very process we are trying to replace.

… The key to the idea that will allow a system of workable morphogenetic sequences to evolve in a not-too great length of time, is highlighted in the genetic ideas of John Holland.

Holland has shown how an information system which guides a real world system may evolve and “learn” by gradually building effective models of functioning, in the form of “genes” … he describes the genes which we know in organisms as a special case of a much more general phenomenon …

…his discovery … mathematical reasons why the learning, and spreading, and successful evolution of … genes, will occur most successfully to the extent that the genes are small and independent … One example of his argument, is simply the fact that at the time of meiosis, when male and female chromosomes cross over and intermingle, the shorter the genes are, the less likely they are to be damaged at the crossover point, and the more likely, therefore, to survive and be passed on to later generations … merely one example of a more general argument … small independent “lumps” of coherent problem-solving information, the smaller they are, and the more independent, the more likely they are to survive and spread into the gene pool …

What is essentially remarkable about the genetic system is that, individually, genes are small … and largely interchangeable. Amazing, but true, that a gene which causes a certain desirable kind of enzyme activity can be transplanted from a fish to a person, sometimes even to a mushroom. Most genes are highly general in what they do. What they do is limited, but “snippable” – each one can be cut out and used, individually, by itself. The “snippet” – the individual genes … are effectively almost context-free …

This is the secret of biological evolution. I believe it will also turn out to be the secret of the evolution of the genes controlling the living structure of the earth and the built world on Earth.

… It is difficult to find the social conditions in which all the features of the construction process can change at the same time, hence extremely difficult to introduce such a new process as a whole. But suppose that the same improved process of contracting is broken up into, say, twenty separable sequences … each one … separable from the nineteen others, and can therefore be successfully injected by itself into an otherwise normal or mainstream system of construction. If the snippet works well, it may be adopted, and may spread to new construction methods …

What was difficult or impossible as a larger act of social transformation, becomes possible when one uses a genetic approach to achieve the same aims. What is needed is simply a way of ‘cutting up’ the original innovative process, into a small set of process genes or small sequences that work individually, and that are robust enough to work in a wide variety of contexts, even when not supported by others part of the new system.”

Christopher Alexander – The Nature of Order – Book 2: The Process of Creating Life

… the first example, that came to my mind, of this are the now common-in-Transition-practices of check-in in the beginnings and check-out at the ends of meetings … a “gene”from the “inner-transition chromosomes” introduced by Sophy Banks

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Christopher Alexander on a Pursuit of Wholeness

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This reminded me of Pirsig’s thoughts on contrarians:

“… you risk a great deal when working within a new paradigm which includes a) human relationships of trust, b) on-going decisions about trade-offs, c) the overall wisdom of how to spend a given modest amount of money to get the best from your money. It is risky within the current system based on a) legalisms, b) blueprints and contracts that preclude sensible adaptation, c) profit and gain, and d) too little human trust.

people who attempt to do these things will be in jeopardy when they attempt to do them within the present system.

… All in all, for more then 40 years I have had the experience that – on any given issue – three times out of four, what I instinctively wanted to do because I thought it was right, was at odds with somebody’s picture of how things ought to be. For years this seemed like a coincidence. Sometimes it seemed to my friends that I was just plain stubborn,,ornery, ‘against everything’ – that I had a built in desire to be in conflict with people. But then, gradually, – and only fully in the last ten or fifteen years – it began to sink in that this apparent source of conflict had a straightforward origin. IT came about, because my instincts were governed, as often as I found possible, by respect for life, respect for wholeness in the world (at least up to the limitation of my ow ability to see it). What I did came from my desire to see the whole, and my desire to build according to the whole, and my refusal to give up on the whole.

… The pursuit of wholeness, pure and simple, was at odds with virtually every institutional and social reality of the 20th century.

… Of course the adventures which I have been living for more than forty years, now, and the observations I have made, might still be attributed to the monomania of a solitary individual, overzealous, who had a blindness to the format and procedures that are proper in the worlds of architecture and society.

… we need to preserve the sacred quality of our life and the life of our cities and our planet, and to seek a new form of processes in which we can be whole.”

Christopher Alexander – The Nature of Order – Book 2: The Process of Creating Life

 

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Svatantra: Entering the Temple of the Heart

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My teacher reflecting on Svatantra … which is the theme that has most touched and informed my own path of practice

“As his pupil my teacher worked at guiding me towards becoming increasingly independent in developing and refining more and more my personal practice skills so I became less and less dependent on him being the vehicle for if, when, where, what and how well I practice.

…. Thus he guided me into self-inspired and self-motivated practice without the need for neutral or even conducive surroundings to influence the mood, or please the eye, ear or nose. Of course adding these factors may arise as a fruit in terms of creating a supportive environment, but the message here was that the ‘temple’ we need to enter ultimately sits within the heart rather than within some external room or building.”

I too:

“am eternally grateful to the initiation into this process”

 

 

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Christopher Alexander on Frederick Taylor

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Frederick Taylor

Frederick Taylor … was one of the individuals who had the greatest influence on the 20th century. An American machinist working at the very end of the 19th century, Taylor conceived the idea of time-and-motion studies … which make the repetitive production of objects more efficient.

Taylor first inspired Henry Ford’s factory at Dearborn, the first highly efficient moder factory. Ford employed Taylor as a consultant while he planned and build this factory. Later, as a direct result of Taylor’s work, almost all natural and organic processes throughout the world which relied on judgment, participation, and common sense were replaced by a way of thinking about process. Which relied on rules, rigidly applied, codification of category, task, function. What we know as he modern organization with machinelike repetition of processes, came from Frederick Taylor. What we know of as modern bureaucracy … came from the application of Frederick Taylor’s ideas to large human institutions … modern construction … modern agriculture …

It is amazing to realize that Taylor himself very well understood the positive social and human conditions of the living process he was trying to replace. Here is a quote from Taylor himself:

”Now, in the best of the ordinary types of management, the managers recognize frankly that the workmen who are under them possess a mass of traditional knowledge most of which is not within the possession of the management. The most experienced managers frankly place before their workmen the problem of doing the work in the best and most economical way. They recognize the task before them as that of inducing each workman to use hist best endeavors, his hardest work, all his traditional knowledge, his skill, his ingenuity, and his good will, in a word, his initiative, so as to yield the largest possible return to his employer”

Taylor understood all this extremely well. And then, for reasons of money and efficiency, he deliberately set out to destroy it. Three principles of Taylorism are: (1) Disassociate the labor process from the skills. Labor must be independent of crraft, tradition, and knwledge … (2) Separate conception from execution. (3) Gain monopoly over knowledge to control labor process … As Taylor himself wrote:

The full possibilities of my system will not have been realized until almost all of the machines in the shop are run by men who are of smaller caliber and attainment, and whoare therefor cheaper than those required under the old system”

… I have given a short summary of Taylor’s ideas because even those of us who are thoroughly sick of the bureaucratic and machinelike character of modern society, will, in general, not be aware of the extent to which it all started with the work of one man, nor the extraordinary extent to which these changes were deliberate, conscious, willfull. Obviously, if all this was created by the deliberate thought of an individual – as indeed it was – it becomes easier for us to conceive the possibility of changing it.”

Christopher Alexander – The Nature of Order – Book 2: The Process of Creating Life

When I read the words “men who are of smaller caliber and attainment” I thought to myself … and then we set about creating systems of education which created (1) such men and (2) men educated to create such men more efficiently.

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